Permitted Development

What is considered to be Permitted Development

An extension or addition to your house is considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, subject to the following limits and conditions:

  • No more than half the area of land around the “original house”* would be covered by additions or other buildings.
  • No extension forward of the principal elevation or side elevation fronting a highway.
  • No extension to be higher than the highest part of the roof.
  • Single-storey rear extension must not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house* by more than three metres if an attached house or by four metres if a detached house.
  • In addition, outside Article 2(3) designated land* and Sites of Special Scientific Interest the limit is increased to 6m if an attached house and 8m if a detached house until 30 May 2019.
  • These increased limits (between 3m and 6m and between 4m and 8m respectively) are subject to the prior notification of the proposal to the Local Planning Authority and the implementation of a neighbour consultation scheme. If objections are received, the proposal might not be allowed.
  • Maximum height of a single-storey rear extension of four metres.
  • Extensions of more than one storey must not extend beyond the rear wall of the original house* by more than three metres.
  • Maximum eaves height of an extension within two metres of the boundary of three metres.
  • Maximum eaves and ridge height of extension no higher than existing house.
  • Side extensions to be single storey with maximum height of four metres and width no more than half that of the original house.
  • Two-storey extensions no closer than seven metres to rear boundary.
  • Roof pitch of extensions higher than one storey to match existing house.
  • Materials to be similar in appearance to the existing house.
  • No verandas, balconies or raised platforms.
  • Upper-floor, side-facing windows to be obscure-glazed; any opening to be 1.7m above the floor.
  • On designated land* no permitted development for rear extensions of more than one storey.
  • On designated land no cladding of the exterior.
  • On designated land no side extensions.

* The term “original house” means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date). Although you may not have built an extension to the house, a previous owner may have done so.

* Designated land includes conservation areas, national parks and the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and World Heritage Sites.

Please note: The permitted development allowances described here apply to houses and not to:

Installation, alteration or replacement of a chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe: Read guidance on the permitted development regime under Class G of the regime.

Please be aware that if your development is over 100 square metres, it may be liable for a charge under the Community Infrastructure Levy.

 

This guidance reflects temporary increases to the size limits for single-storey rear extensions that must be completed by 30 May 2019, and the associated neighbour consultation scheme.

Please note: It has been stated by Government that these increased size limits will be made permanent, but no detailed information has been provided in regard to how and when this will occur.

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Permitted Development Rights withdrawn

 

 

You should also note that the local planning authority may have removed some of your permitted development rights by issuing an ‘Article 4’ direction. This will mean that you have to submit a planning application for work which normally does not need one.

Article 4 directions are made when the character of an area of acknowledged importance would be threatened. They are most common in conservation areas. You will probably know if your property is affected by such a direction, but you can check with the local planning authority if you are not sure. In Sheffield, this means that within an Article 4 area such as Crookes, Nether Edge and Broomhill you need to apply for planning permission to convert a dwellinghouse (Use class C3) into an HMO for 3 to 6 unrelated people (Use class C4).

Houses created through permitted development rights to change use from shops, financial and professional services premises or agricultural buildings cannot use householder permitted development rights to improve, alter or extend homes: planning permission is required. We can advise here.

Permitted development rights can also be withdrawn on an individual basis when planning permission is granted for a particular new build house or new housing estate, and the planning authority wishes to remove the permitted development rights as they feel that the proposal has already maximised the desired development on the available land. We see this sometimes with a recently-built home when we are approached by a potential client wishing to extend – they might find that their permitted development rights have been removed.

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